Magical Readathon | TBR

Hello there, magical people~ I hope you’re doing well. Today I’m going to be talking about the Magical Readathon hosted by Book Roast over on YouTube. This readathon is themed around the Harry Potter universe and includes classes in twelve subjects at Hogwarts, as well as twelve potential careers (and extra seminars and courses) you can take in your time at and after Hogwarts! This seemed like such a fun activity, and I was a bit too late to join the last few times I saw the announcements, but I’m finally early and ready to try this readathon for myself!

Now, if you would like all the details about the readathon, there are links in the video that Book Roast talks about the announcement here, but to summarize, it’s an event that’s taking place for the entire month of April from the 1st to the 30th, and during that time you pick books based on the prompts given for each of the twelve classes, and each class comes with a prompt designated to it:

  • Ancient Runes: Heart Rune – heart on the cover or the title
  • Arithmancy: Magical qualities of number 2 – balance/opposites – read something outside of your favorite genre
  • Astronomy: Night classes – read majority of this book when it’s dark outside
  • Care of Magical Creatures: Hippogriffs – creature with a beak on the cover
  • Charms: Lumos Maxima – white cover
  • Defense Against the Dark Arts: Grindylows – book set at sea/coast
  • Divination: Third Eye – assign numbers to your TBR and use a random number generator to pick your read
  • Herbology: Mimbulus mimbletonia – title starts with an M
  • History of Magic: Witch hunts – book featuring witches/wizards
  • Muggle Studies: Book from the perspective of a muggle (contemporary)
  • Potions: Shrinking Solution – book under 150 pages
  • Transfiguration: Animagus lecture – book/series that includes shapeshifting

You can also pick a career path to take after your Hogwarts career (this is totally optional) and allows you to focus on and potentially narrow down which books from which class you read. Careers include: Alchemist, Astronomer, Aurologist, Auror, Broom Maker, Care of Magical Children, Culinary Sorcerer, Curse Breaker, Graphic Designer, Healer, Herbologist, Hogwarts Professor, Journalist or Writer, Librarian, Mage of Visual Arts, Magizoologist, Metal Charmer, Mind Medic, Ministry Worker, Potioneer, Quidditch Referee, Seer, Spell Maker, Trader of Magical Tomes, and Wandmaker. (For more on these, check out the video I linked above!)

So for this readathon, I want to get back into the swing of reading novels (as has been in the case in almost every post I’ve made lately lol), but I didn’t want to overwhelm myself as it’ll be the first actual readathon I participate in this year. Picking a career was tough, but I decided to go with Writer, and I might double up with Graphic Designer, if I have the time and energy to do so. I’ll also be taking a bonus course called Merpeople Linguistics.

Let’s break this down!

Writer O.W.L.s Needed

  • History of Magic
  • Muggle Studies
  • 1 other subject of your choice (I chose Astronomy)

The books I chose for this Writer O.W.L. are:

Graphic Designer O.W.L.s Needed

  • Ancient Runes
  • Charms
  • History of Magic
  • Transfiguration

The books I chose for the Graphic Designer O.W.L. are:

And for my extra course/seminar, the Merpeople Linguistics course, I’ll be reading a book for Herbology: Memoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden. This one will be a reread for me.

Oh man, it’s a lot to take in, but I’m very excited. All of these books (except for Heartless) are also on my POPSugar Challenge for 2020, so I’m killing two birds with one stone.

I’m definitely aiming for just the first three books in the Writer’s career O.W.L.s as I don’t want to overwhelm myself, but I think having plenty of options is good for this challenge.

There will also be other challenges hosted on the Twitter, @magicathon, and there’s also a discord for you to join if you want! (Links in the video listed earlier in this post!)

Are you going to be joining the readathon? Which career are you aiming for? Is this your first O.W.L.s? Let me know all your thoughts in the comments below!

January TBR

What’s this? What’s this? There’s books waiting to be read~ What’s this? It’s this month’s TBR!

Okay, corny song aside, I haven’t done one of these in… years. Since 2015, to be exact (at least for monthly TBRs. I’ve since made challenge TBRs). I stopped because I often found myself not actually reading the books in said TBR because I’m such a mood reader, but this year I want to try to set a goal and actually achieve it.

So, the other day I posted my list for the POPSUGAR 2020 Reading Challenge, and I’m definitely going to stick to that list for most of my reading. There are some books I want to read that aren’t on my list, but are on my shelves, so yeah.

Since there’s roughly four weeks per month, I want to aim to read one book per week, so these TBRs will have (at least) four books listed for me to read. This isn’t including all of the webcomics and other stories I keep up with online, mind you, but just novels/manga/comics that I hope to read.

I’m going to attempt to read three books from the main list for the challenge, and then one book from the advanced list each month.

I’ve also included a bonus book in each month because there are books that I’ve been reading for way too long and just need to finish, or I started last year and still need to finish.

Okay, enough rambling, here’s my TBR for January!

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern – Bonus book!

Zachary Ezra Rawlins is a graduate student in Vermont when he discovers a mysterious book hidden in the stacks. As he turns the pages, entranced by tales of lovelorn prisoners, key collectors, and nameless acolytes, he reads something strange: a story from his own childhood. Bewildered by this inexplicable book and desperate to make sense of how his own life came to be recorded, Zachary uncovers a series of clues — a bee, a key, and a sword — that lead him to a masquerade party in New York, to a secret club, and through a doorway to an ancient library, hidden far below the surface of the earth.

What Zachary finds in this curious place is more than just a buried home for books and their guardians — it is a place of lost cities and seas, lovers who pass notes under doors and across time, and of stories whispered by the dead. Zachary learns of those who have sacrificed much to protect this realm, relinquishing their sight and their tongues to preserve this archive, and also those who are intent on its destruction.

Together with Mirabel, a fierce, pink-haired protector of the place, and Dorian, a handsome, barefoot man with shifting alliances, Zachary travels the twisting tunnels, darkened stairwells, crowded ballrooms, and sweetly-soaked shores of this magical world, discovering his purpose–in both the mysterious book and in his own life.

Remembrance by Rita Woods – Challenge prompt: A book that’s published in 2020

Remembrance…It’s a rumor, a whisper passed in the fields and veiled behind sheets of laundry. A hidden stop on the underground road to freedom, a safe haven protected by more than secrecy…if you can make it there.

Ohio, present day. An elderly woman who is more than she seems warns against rising racism as a young woman grapples with her life.

Haiti, 1791, on the brink of revolution. When the slave Abigail is forced from her children to take her mistress to safety, she discovers New Orleans has its own powers.

1857 New Orleansa city of unrest: Following tragedy, house girl Margot is sold just before her 18th birthday and her promised freedom. Desperate, she escapes and chases a whisper…. Remembrance.

The Map of Salt and Stars by Zeyn Joukhadar – Challenge prompt: A book written by a trans or non-binary author

The story of two girls living eight hundred years apart—a modern-day Syrian refugee seeking safety and a medieval adventurer apprenticed to a legendary mapmaker.

It is the summer of 2011, and Nour has just lost her father to cancer. Her mother, a cartographer who creates unusual, hand-painted maps, decides to move Nour and her sisters from New York City back to Syria to be closer to their family. But the country Nour’s mother once knew is changing, and it isn’t long before protests and shelling threaten their quiet Homs neighborhood. When a shell destroys Nour’s house and almost takes her life, she and her family are forced to choose: stay and risk more violence or flee as refugees across seven countries of the Middle East and North Africa in search of safety. As their journey becomes more and more challenging, Nour’s idea of home becomes a dream she struggles to remember and a hope she cannot live without.

More than eight hundred years earlier, Rawiya, sixteen and a widow’s daughter, knows she must do something to help her impoverished mother. Restless and longing to see the world, she leaves home to seek her fortune. Disguising herself as a boy named Rami, she becomes an apprentice to al-Idrisi, who has been commissioned by King Roger II of Sicily to create a map of the world. In his employ, Rawiya embarks on an epic journey across the Middle East and the north of Africa where she encounters ferocious mythical beasts, epic battles, and real historical figures.

An Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green – Challenge prompt: A book with a great first line

The Carls just appeared.

Roaming through New York City at three a.m., twenty-three-year-old April May stumbles across a giant sculpture. Delighted by its appearance and craftsmanship–like a ten-foot-tall Transformer wearing a suit of samurai armor–April and her best friend, Andy, make a video with it, which Andy uploads to YouTube. The next day, April wakes up to a viral video and a new life. News quickly spreads that there are Carls in dozens of cities around the world–from Beijing to Buenos Aires–and April, as their first documentarian, finds herself at the center of an intense international media spotlight.

Seizing the opportunity to make her mark on the world, April now has to deal with the consequences her new particular brand of fame has on her relationships, her safety, and her own identity. And all eyes are on April to figure out not just what the Carls are, but what they want from us.

Sorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson – Advanced challenge prompt: A book written by an author in their 20s.

All sorcerers are evil. Elisabeth has known that as long as she has known anything. Raised as a foundling in one of Austermeer’s Great Libraries, Elisabeth has grown up among the tools of sorcery—magical grimoires that whisper on shelves and rattle beneath iron chains. If provoked, they transform into grotesque monsters of ink and leather. She hopes to become a warden, charged with protecting the kingdom from their power.

Then an act of sabotage releases the library’s most dangerous grimoire. Elisabeth’s desperate intervention implicates her in the crime, and she is torn from her home to face justice in the capital. With no one to turn to but her sworn enemy, the sorcerer Nathaniel Thorn, and his mysterious demonic servant, she finds herself entangled in a centuries-old conspiracy. Not only could the Great Libraries go up in flames, but the world along with them.

As her alliance with Nathaniel grows stronger, Elisabeth starts to question everything she’s been taught—about sorcerers, about the libraries she loves, even about herself. For Elisabeth has a power she has never guessed, and a future she could never have imagined.


That’s all I have for this month! I’m excited to see what this month of reading brings and to see how these challenges push me to read books I never would have thought to pick up otherwise (probably).

Let’s chat!

What are your reading goals for this month? Any book in particular you’re excited to read? Anything on my list catch your eye? Let me know!

POPSUGAR 2020 Reading Challenge

Image source: POPSUGAR Photography

Hey! So I wanted to make a list of books I hope to read this year that can fit the categories for the POPSUGAR reading challenge. I don’t have all of the prompts filled as I might find other books to fit the prompts, plus I’m giving myself options since my goal is to read 25 books this year, not 52. (But if I do all of these challenges, then yay for me!)

I won’t necessarily be reading these in the order listed, either, since I’m such a mood reader. I also picked as many books as I could already on my shelves, on my kindle, or on audible that I already own.

So anyway, here’s the official list with my choices for books, and here’s where you can find their pretty printable list on their site!

2020 Challenge – Regular prompts

1. A book that’s published in 2020Remembrance by Rita Woods
2. A book by a trans or nonbinary authorThe Map of Salt and Stars by Zeyn Joukhadar
3. A book with a great first lineAn Absolutely Remarkable Thing by Hank Green
4. A book about a book clubThe Guernsey Literary and Potato Peel Pie Society by Mary Ann Shaffer
5. A book set in a city that has hosted the OlympicsThe Book Thief by Markus Zusak
6. A bildungsromanThe Seven Husbands of Evelyn Hugo by Taylor Jenkins Reid
7. The first book you touch on a shelf with your eyes closedAll the Bright Places by Jennifer Niven (I had my husband pick with his eyes closed)
8. A book with an upside-down image on the coverGirls Made of Snow and Glass by Melissa Bashardoust
9. A book with a mapThe City of Brass by S.A. Chakraborty
10. A book recommended by your favorite blog, vlog, podcast, or online book clubThe Well of Ascension by Brandon Sanderson
11. An anthologyThe Language of Thorns by Leigh Bardugo
12. A book that passes the Bechdel testJane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte
13. A book with the same title as a movie or TV show but is unrelated to itRenegades by Marissa Meyer
14. A book by an author with flora or fauna in their nameThe Wicked King by Holly Black
15. A book about or involving social mediaTweet Cute by Emma Lord
16. A book that has a book on the coverPersuasion by Jane Austen
17. A medical thrillerThe Andromeda Strain by Michael Crichton
18. A book with a made-up languageWords of Radiance by Brandon Sanderson
19. A book set in a country beginning with “C”Anne of Green Gables by L.M. Montgomery
20. A book you picked because the title caught your attentionThe Invisible Library by Genevieve Cogman
21. A book published the month of your birthdayThe Color Project by Sierra Abrams
22. A book about or by a woman in STEMHidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly
23. A book that won an award in 2019Girl, Woman, Other by Bernadine Evaristo
24. A book on a subject you know nothing aboutThe Morrigan: Celtic Goddess of Magick and Might by Courtney Weber
25. A book with only words on the cover, no images or graphicsA Midsummer Night’s Dream by William Shakespeare
26. A book with a pun in the titleDying to Please by Linda Howard
27. A book featuring one of the seven deadly sinsPride and Prejudice by Jane Austen
28. A book with a robot, cyborg, or AI characterWires and Nerves vol 1 by Marissa Meyer
29. A book with a bird on the coverThis Is How You Lose the Time War by Amal El-Mohtar and Max Gladstone
30. A fiction or nonfiction book about a world leaderBecoming by Michelle Obama
31. A book with “gold,” “silver,” or “bronze” in the titleThe Bronze Horseman by Paulina Simons
32. A book by a WOCThe Hate U Give by Angie Thomas
33. A book with at least a four-star rating on GoodreadsThe Fifth Season by N.K. Jemisin
34. A book you meant to read in 2019Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo
35. A book with a three-word titleWink Poppy Midnight by April Genevieve Tucholke
36. A book with a pink coverThe Iron Queen by Julie Kagawa
37. A WesternVengeance Road by Erin Bowman
38. A book by or about a journalistNext Year in Havana by Chanel Cleeton
39. Read a banned book during Banned Books WeekThe Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexi
40. Your favorite prompt from a past POPSUGAR Reading Challenge – 2017: Involving a mythical creature – A Natural History of Dragons: A Memoir by Lady Trent by Marie Brennan

2020 Challenge – Advanced prompts

1. A book written by an author in their 20sSorcery of Thorns by Margaret Rogerson
2. A book with “20” or “twenty” in the titleTwenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea by Jules Verne
3. A book with a character with a vision impairment or enhancement (a nod to 20/20 vision)All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr
4. A book set in the 1920sMemoirs of a Geisha by Arthur Golden
5. A book set in Japan, host of the 2020 OlympicsPachinko by Min Jin Lee
6. A book by an author who has written more than 20 booksVision in White by Nora Roberts
7. A book with more than 20 letters in its titleThe Strange and Beautiful Sorrows of Ava Lavender by Leslye Walton
8. A book published in the 20th centuryNeverwhere by Neil Gaiman
9. A book from a series with more than 20 booksNoragami vol 21 by Adachitoka
10. A book with a main character in their 20sMagic Slays by Ilona Andrews

And that’s it! Those are the 50 books I hope to read in 2020, but my overall reading goal is to read 25 books, so if I read half of this list, I’ll consider that a win.

Let’s chat!

What are some of your reading goals for 2020? What book would you read that takes place in Japan? Or what about a book about or by a woman in STEM? Let me know!

2020 Reading Goals & Challenges

We’re still quite early on in December, but I wanted to talk about some of my reading goals and challenges that I’m setting for myself in 2020 because, let’s be real, my reading the past few years has been a bit lackluster. So I really want to challenge myself to read novels again (and keep up with webcomics, of course, which has been 90% of what I’ve been reading the last few years).

Anyway, I’m also going to be talking about my year end goal for this year. It’s not much, but it’s something I’m going to hope to achieve before December is over.

So, let’s talk about them!

December 2019 Year End Goals

I have a couple of books I started reading this year, got about halfway through, and then put down and never picked up again, so I want to fix that lol (Not that I lost interest, per se, I’ve just had a very up and down mental and emotional year.)

So the books I want to complete by the end of December are:

Strange the Dreamer by Laini Taylor – I’m 55% of the way through as of this post, and I was loving it so much! I think I lost motivation because I ruined part of it on myself by looking ahead and just… I need to stop that lol

Six of Crows by Leigh Bardugo – I’m 39.78% of the way through the book as of this post, and again, it’s not that I wasn’t enjoying it, it was that my reading mood shifted and I just couldn’t pick it up for a while.

Those are the two primary books I want to read by the end of this year. I know I can do it; I just have to set some time to do so.

Okay, so these are some books I know I’m going to finish this month:

The Way of Kings by Brandon Sanderson – I have been listening to this audiobook on and off for… too damn long lol I have about 7.5 hours left to go as of this post, so I’m FINISHING IT DAMMIT. (The audiobook is 45 hours in length, so… it’s been a journey lol but a good one!) I love this book and can’t wait to start the next audibook – which is even longer than the first! 😀 *cry* And the third is even longer than the second… *sob* (It’s really fine. The story is fantastic so far!)

An Enchantment of Ravens by Margaret Rogerson – I started this book on a whim a few days ago because I really just wanted to read something that wasn’t a webcomic (or anything else on my shelf, clearly), and started reading this on my kindle and haven’t stopped. I’m about half way through and really enjoying it because I didn’t realize it was faeries, and I love faerie stories, so it’s been a great read for me so far.

The Starless Sea by Erin Morgenstern – A few customers at my seasonal job (a bookstore) were telling me about how they or a relative/friend read this, and after reading the synopsis, I had to pick it up. WELL, I started and didn’t want to put it down, so. Definitely going to finish this book this month. It’s already magical and I’m only 24 pages into it as of writing this post.

I doubt I’ll have time to finish anything else this month, so I’ll leave other things for next year.

Speaking of, let’s talk about my goals for next year!

Reading Goals & Challenges for 2020

As I said earlier, I miss reading novels- truly, I do. And though I’ve been reading some here and there, I miss the days where I was reading 50 books in a year (about a book a week), and though I’m not aiming to hit that number again, I do want to try to read maybe half of that?

That was actually my goal for 2019, and, well… yeah, even if I read the five books above, I’d still be five short of that 25 book goal. But that’s fine! I’ll be a little disappointed in myself, but I’m not going to let it hinder me. I still read a decent amount of books – more than last year, for sure – and I’m proud of that! So, I’m going to keep that goal:

2020 Reading Goal: 25 books for the year

Now, let’s talk challenges. I want to seriously challenge myself in 2020 for a multitude of reasons, and so now I’m going to talk about some of the challenges I’m setting for myself this upcoming year:

Challenge 1: Any book on my TBR for that month MUST already exist on my shelves. That’s right. I’m going to try my best to not buy more books than I read this year. I want to seriously cut down my TBR since I’ve had some books for five years or so and haven’t touched them. (This may also include donating more books to my local library.) Of course, there will be some exceptions. But 99% of what I pick I want to already come from my shelves.

Challenge 2: Read at least three classics throughout the year. And by that, I still mean classics that are on my shelves. I mainly want to focus on Jane Austen, but I’ve got a few others I’d like to read at some point. Even though I find classics very difficult to get through, this is listed as a challenge for a reason.

Challenge 3: Complete as many reading prompts from the POPSUGAR Reading Challenge as I can. I wanted to participate in it this year, but I quickly fell off of the wagon, so I’m aiming to do as much as I can (and want) in 2020! They have such a fun list, so why not?

There’s no real reward or punishment that comes from completing or not completing these challenges other than the satisfaction of doing so. Maybe I should reward myself with chocolate or something…

Anyway, I think that’s it for my reading goals for next year! I’m not trying to push myself too hard, but rather ease myself back into reading. It’s been a rough few years mentally and emotionally, and I’ve only been recently starting to feel a little more human and less robotic. So I hope that 2020 brings a lot more happiness in the reading department as a result.

Let’s chat!

Tell me what your reading goals are for the new year! Are you planning on participating in any challenges? What are you most looking forward to next year (non-book related, if you want)? Let me know in the comments!